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-
- Linux Gadget Serial Driver v2.0
- 11/20/2004
- (updated 8-May-2008 for v2.3)
-
-
-License and Disclaimer
-----------------------
-This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of
-the License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
-GNU General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
-License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
-Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston,
-MA 02111-1307 USA.
-
-This document and the gadget serial driver itself are
-Copyright (C) 2004 by Al Borchers (alborchers@steinerpoint.com).
-
-If you have questions, problems, or suggestions for this driver
-please contact Al Borchers at alborchers@steinerpoint.com.
-
-
-Prerequisites
--------------
-Versions of the gadget serial driver are available for the
-2.4 Linux kernels, but this document assumes you are using
-version 2.3 or later of the gadget serial driver in a 2.6
-Linux kernel.
-
-This document assumes that you are familiar with Linux and
-Windows and know how to configure and build Linux kernels, run
-standard utilities, use minicom and HyperTerminal, and work with
-USB and serial devices. It also assumes you configure the Linux
-gadget and usb drivers as modules.
-
-With version 2.3 of the driver, major and minor device nodes are
-no longer statically defined. Your Linux based system should mount
-sysfs in /sys, and use "mdev" (in Busybox) or "udev" to make the
-/dev nodes matching the sysfs /sys/class/tty files.
-
-
-
-Overview
---------
-The gadget serial driver is a Linux USB gadget driver, a USB device
-side driver. It runs on a Linux system that has USB device side
-hardware; for example, a PDA, an embedded Linux system, or a PC
-with a USB development card.
-
-The gadget serial driver talks over USB to either a CDC ACM driver
-or a generic USB serial driver running on a host PC.
-
- Host
- --------------------------------------
- | Host-Side CDC ACM USB Host |
- | Operating | or | Controller | USB
- | System | Generic USB | Driver |--------
- | (Linux or | Serial | and | |
- | Windows) Driver USB Stack | |
- -------------------------------------- |
- |
- |
- |
- Gadget |
- -------------------------------------- |
- | Gadget USB Periph. | |
- | Device-Side | Gadget | Controller | |
- | Linux | Serial | Driver |--------
- | Operating | Driver | and |
- | System USB Stack |
- --------------------------------------
-
-On the device-side Linux system, the gadget serial driver looks
-like a serial device.
-
-On the host-side system, the gadget serial device looks like a
-CDC ACM compliant class device or a simple vendor specific device
-with bulk in and bulk out endpoints, and it is treated similarly
-to other serial devices.
-
-The host side driver can potentially be any ACM compliant driver
-or any driver that can talk to a device with a simple bulk in/out
-interface. Gadget serial has been tested with the Linux ACM driver,
-the Windows usbser.sys ACM driver, and the Linux USB generic serial
-driver.
-
-With the gadget serial driver and the host side ACM or generic
-serial driver running, you should be able to communicate between
-the host and the gadget side systems as if they were connected by a
-serial cable.
-
-The gadget serial driver only provides simple unreliable data
-communication. It does not yet handle flow control or many other
-features of normal serial devices.
-
-
-Installing the Gadget Serial Driver
------------------------------------
-To use the gadget serial driver you must configure the Linux gadget
-side kernel for "Support for USB Gadgets", for a "USB Peripheral
-Controller" (for example, net2280), and for the "Serial Gadget"
-driver. All this are listed under "USB Gadget Support" when
-configuring the kernel. Then rebuild and install the kernel or
-modules.
-
-Then you must load the gadget serial driver. To load it as an
-ACM device (recommended for interoperability), do this:
-
- modprobe g_serial
-
-To load it as a vendor specific bulk in/out device, do this:
-
- modprobe g_serial use_acm=0
-
-This will also automatically load the underlying gadget peripheral
-controller driver. This must be done each time you reboot the gadget
-side Linux system. You can add this to the start up scripts, if
-desired.
-
-Your system should use mdev (from busybox) or udev to make the
-device nodes. After this gadget driver has been set up you should
-then see a /dev/ttyGS0 node:
-
- # ls -l /dev/ttyGS0 | cat
- crw-rw---- 1 root root 253, 0 May 8 14:10 /dev/ttyGS0
- #
-
-Note that the major number (253, above) is system-specific. If
-you need to create /dev nodes by hand, the right numbers to use
-will be in the /sys/class/tty/ttyGS0/dev file.
-
-When you link this gadget driver early, perhaps even statically,
-you may want to set up an /etc/inittab entry to run "getty" on it.
-The /dev/ttyGS0 line should work like most any other serial port.
-
-
-If gadget serial is loaded as an ACM device you will want to use
-either the Windows or Linux ACM driver on the host side. If gadget
-serial is loaded as a bulk in/out device, you will want to use the
-Linux generic serial driver on the host side. Follow the appropriate
-instructions below to install the host side driver.
-
-
-Installing the Windows Host ACM Driver
---------------------------------------
-To use the Windows ACM driver you must have the "linux-cdc-acm.inf"
-file (provided along this document) which supports all recent versions
-of Windows.
-
-When the gadget serial driver is loaded and the USB device connected
-to the Windows host with a USB cable, Windows should recognize the
-gadget serial device and ask for a driver. Tell Windows to find the
-driver in the folder that contains the "linux-cdc-acm.inf" file.
-
-For example, on Windows XP, when the gadget serial device is first
-plugged in, the "Found New Hardware Wizard" starts up. Select
-"Install from a list or specific location (Advanced)", then on the
-next screen select "Include this location in the search" and enter the
-path or browse to the folder containing the "linux-cdc-acm.inf" file.
-Windows will complain that the Gadget Serial driver has not passed
-Windows Logo testing, but select "Continue anyway" and finish the
-driver installation.
-
-On Windows XP, in the "Device Manager" (under "Control Panel",
-"System", "Hardware") expand the "Ports (COM & LPT)" entry and you
-should see "Gadget Serial" listed as the driver for one of the COM
-ports.
-
-To uninstall the Windows XP driver for "Gadget Serial", right click
-on the "Gadget Serial" entry in the "Device Manager" and select
-"Uninstall".
-
-
-Installing the Linux Host ACM Driver
-------------------------------------
-To use the Linux ACM driver you must configure the Linux host side
-kernel for "Support for Host-side USB" and for "USB Modem (CDC ACM)
-support".
-
-Once the gadget serial driver is loaded and the USB device connected
-to the Linux host with a USB cable, the host system should recognize
-the gadget serial device. For example, the command
-
- cat /proc/bus/usb/devices
-
-should show something like this:
-
-T: Bus=01 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=01 Cnt=02 Dev#= 5 Spd=480 MxCh= 0
-D: Ver= 2.00 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS=64 #Cfgs= 1
-P: Vendor=0525 ProdID=a4a7 Rev= 2.01
-S: Manufacturer=Linux 2.6.8.1 with net2280
-S: Product=Gadget Serial
-S: SerialNumber=0
-C:* #Ifs= 2 Cfg#= 2 Atr=c0 MxPwr= 2mA
-I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=02 Prot=01 Driver=acm
-E: Ad=83(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 8 Ivl=32ms
-I: If#= 1 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=0a(data ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=acm
-E: Ad=81(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
-E: Ad=02(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
-
-If the host side Linux system is configured properly, the ACM driver
-should be loaded automatically. The command "lsmod" should show the
-"acm" module is loaded.
-
-
-Installing the Linux Host Generic USB Serial Driver
----------------------------------------------------
-To use the Linux generic USB serial driver you must configure the
-Linux host side kernel for "Support for Host-side USB", for "USB
-Serial Converter support", and for the "USB Generic Serial Driver".
-
-Once the gadget serial driver is loaded and the USB device connected
-to the Linux host with a USB cable, the host system should recognize
-the gadget serial device. For example, the command
-
- cat /proc/bus/usb/devices
-
-should show something like this:
-
-T: Bus=01 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=01 Cnt=02 Dev#= 6 Spd=480 MxCh= 0
-D: Ver= 2.00 Cls=ff(vend.) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS=64 #Cfgs= 1
-P: Vendor=0525 ProdID=a4a6 Rev= 2.01
-S: Manufacturer=Linux 2.6.8.1 with net2280
-S: Product=Gadget Serial
-S: SerialNumber=0
-C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=c0 MxPwr= 2mA
-I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=0a(data ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=serial
-E: Ad=81(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
-E: Ad=02(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
-
-You must explicitly load the usbserial driver with parameters to
-configure it to recognize the gadget serial device, like this:
-
- modprobe usbserial vendor=0x0525 product=0xA4A6
-
-If everything is working, usbserial will print a message in the
-system log saying something like "Gadget Serial converter now
-attached to ttyUSB0".
-
-
-Testing with Minicom or HyperTerminal
--------------------------------------
-Once the gadget serial driver and the host driver are both installed,
-and a USB cable connects the gadget device to the host, you should
-be able to communicate over USB between the gadget and host systems.
-You can use minicom or HyperTerminal to try this out.
-
-On the gadget side run "minicom -s" to configure a new minicom
-session. Under "Serial port setup" set "/dev/ttygserial" as the
-"Serial Device". Set baud rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits,
-to 9600, 8, none, and 1--these settings mostly do not matter.
-Under "Modem and dialing" erase all the modem and dialing strings.
-
-On a Linux host running the ACM driver, configure minicom similarly
-but use "/dev/ttyACM0" as the "Serial Device". (If you have other
-ACM devices connected, change the device name appropriately.)
-
-On a Linux host running the USB generic serial driver, configure
-minicom similarly, but use "/dev/ttyUSB0" as the "Serial Device".
-(If you have other USB serial devices connected, change the device
-name appropriately.)
-
-On a Windows host configure a new HyperTerminal session to use the
-COM port assigned to Gadget Serial. The "Port Settings" will be
-set automatically when HyperTerminal connects to the gadget serial
-device, so you can leave them set to the default values--these
-settings mostly do not matter.
-
-With minicom configured and running on the gadget side and with
-minicom or HyperTerminal configured and running on the host side,
-you should be able to send data back and forth between the gadget
-side and host side systems. Anything you type on the terminal
-window on the gadget side should appear in the terminal window on
-the host side and vice versa.